Market Drayton

For the last few days I have been at Market Drayton, while some engineering work was carried out on my boat, of which more in another post.

I have been to “Drayton”, as the locals say, several times to play hockey, but never before visited the town centre.  Here are images from this pleasant town with several pubs, a

brewery, and many old buildings.  In 1651 a fire started at a bakery and swept through the town, destroying about three quarters of the buildings.

This mute swan (which had its eye on a parsley plant) came to take bread from the gunwale only about fifteen inches from me, but was an aggressive protector of cygnets, challenging these canoeists.  At times it would chase ducks away, flapping its wings on the water, sounding like a horse galloping on cobble stones.

The Clive & Coffyne is partly a reference to Clive of India, perhaps Drayton’s most famous son.

The Salopian Star is an old-fashioned public house.  For those unfamiliar with English geography, Salop is an old (or alternative) name for Shropshire, so a Salopian is someone from that county.  The owner, who operates several pubs, brews beer and, in this pub only, charges £2 per pint!  I preferred the New Session IPA to the Alchemist brew.

Joule’s Brewery produces a range of fine ales and a craft lager.  The Red Lion is the brewery tap, and well worth a visit.  Slumbering Monk, a dark bitter, went down nicely, especially while watching Germany embarrassed by South Korea.

supply boats Betton Mill day 2
Supply boats at Betton Mill. In my previous post, I failed to point out that these are just the sort of boats that my Evans ancestors would have lived and worked on.

 

WWII defence
World War II pill box.  Apparently, there was a theory that the Wehrmacht would use canals to penetrate British defences, and these bunkers were placed along canals at various places up and down the network.

And finally …

 

 

WM watering Betton Mill
Whiskey Mac taking on the right kind of water at Betton Mill.  It took 40 minutes to fill a tank of 150 gallons (approx. 700 litres).

 

 

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