BMD PDF

The General Register Office (GRO) is running a pilot enabling entries of birth, marriage, and death to be delivered in PDF format, rather than through the post.  The cost per entry is £6 by PDF and £9.25 by post.  I thought I would give it a try.

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Sinking feeling

I was sure I had posted this before, perhaps via Brownhhills Bob, but, try as I might, I can’t find it.

This is about the demise of George Carter (1859-1906), who was my grandmother Florence’s uncle and was a coal miner.  He died of injuries sustained in an “accident” at Brownhills No.3 pit, known as The Sinking, operated by William Harrison Ltd. I believe this pit was at Slackey Lane (now Hazel Lane), Great Wyrley, where the industrial buildings are today.

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Steam Mill Street

Way back in 1836 Edward Evans was baptised in the Primitive Methodist Chapel on Steam Mill Street, Chester.  According to the register it was on 25 May 1836.  Edward was born on 5 January of that year in the parish of St John’s, the sixth child of William Evans and Priscilla Mould (sic).  So, as I am staying nearby, I went to Chester to see what remains.  Edward was my grandmother’s grandfather.  Some of his story is told in Evans the Boat.

edward evans 1836 baptism
Edward Evans baptism.

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Gone, but (not quite) forgotten

A bit of family history, well someone’s family history, at least.

gateway
A gateway into history

On my way back from Stratford-upon-Avon Parkway station, I passed the overgrown St Peters Graveyard in Bishopton.  Having plenty of time I thought I would mooch about.  Continue reading “Gone, but (not quite) forgotten”

X marks the spot

Prime Minister from Liverpool to May

I have featured this coin before. These pictures were the first I took with a new lens that acts as a short range telephoto (90 mm) and macro, or close-up. But what was going on when it was minted two centuries ago?

As mentioned in my blog about the year without a summer, 1816, the country was suffering. Wages were in decline, harvests failing, the price of grain rising and with it the cost of daily bread. There remained a surplus of labour following the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815. Continue reading “X marks the spot”

Ancestry Genetic Communities

Ancestry Genetic Communities is a new(ish) service for those who have used Ancestry’s DNA analysis.  The original analysis breaks down into broad groups based on DNA inherited thousands of years ago: in my case Great Britain, Europe West, Scandinavia and Ireland (mainly), and I looked at this in Earlier Origins & DNA.

DNA areas
My DNA profile. Ancient in pastel shades; modern in orange and red.

Ancestry has now assigned people to genetic communities based on DNA acquired in the last few hundreds of years, during the era of written records.  It would therefore be surprising if these communities did not reflect extensive research going back up to 450-500 years. Continue reading “Ancestry Genetic Communities”

N is for …

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

st james the great longdon (480x360)
St James the Great, Longdon, Staffordshire.

Neville

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred:  John Nevell, father of Mary Nevell, born about 1698, Longdon, Staffordshire.
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