V is for …

The latest in my ad hoc series on surname origins.

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

Van Dyck

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Georgette Van Dyck, who married Allan James Dennis (my 3rd cousin, about whom I know only the rudiments of hatch, match and despatch) in 1945, registered Cannock.  I suspect they met in the Netherlands during the war.  In 1939 James and his mother lived at the corner of Brownhills Road and Norton East Road, Norton Canes, Staffordshire. Continue reading “V is for …”

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Market Drayton

For the last few days I have been at Market Drayton, while some engineering work was carried out on my boat, of which more in another post.

I have been to “Drayton”, as the locals say, several times to play hockey, but never before visited the town centre.  Here are images from this pleasant town with several pubs, a
Continue reading “Market Drayton”

Supply boats at Betton Mill

Betton Mill, Market Drayton.

These boats moored up next to me while I awaited professional attention to my ailing batteries and inverter charger, of which more later.

They supply coal, gas, fenders, pump out and other services and goods to other boats on the cut.   The Chamberlain Carrying Company.

Continue reading “Supply boats at Betton Mill”

In William’s Wake

WM above Audlem
Whiskey Mac above Audlem – I would prefer to lose the ‘e’, but it came with the boat. One day …

Here I am on the Shropshire Union Canal at Audlem, Cheshire.  Sometime in the late 1830’s my fourth great grandfather William Evans, a boatman, travelled this way with his family.  Some of the places along the way would be recognisable to him now. Continue reading “In William’s Wake”

U is for …

The latest in my ad hoc series on surname origins.

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

Underwood

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred:  John Underwood, father of Mary Underwood, baptised 25 January 1713, St Mary, Stafford, Staffordshire.

St Mary the Virgin Stafford font Geograph Alan Murray-Rust
Medieval font, St Mary the Virgin, Stafford, where Mary was baptised. Via Geograph, copyright Alan Murray-Rust, creative commons.

A dweller below a wood on a hillside, or from a place named Underwood, such as in Derbyshire or Nottinghamshire.  There is a Weston Underwood about five miles north west of Derby.

Upton

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred:  Richard Upton, born about 1754, probably at Bishops Wood, Staffordshire.

From one of the numerous places named Upton.

Ushawood / Usherwood

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred:  John Usherwood, father of Elizabeth Usherwood, baptised 6 February 1687, Measham, Derbyshire.

This name is bundled up with Isherwood.  “From an unknown place, probably in Lancashire”.  The Internet Surname Database suggests derivation from a lost village in the parish of Bolton-le-Moors, Lancashire (today just Bolton).  On the Ordnance Survey of 1844 is an Isherwood Fold, to the north east of Bolton.  There seems to be no other landscape recollection at that time.

 

The Ancient House of Medlicott

When I first encountered an ancestor whose name was Medlicott I thought it was just another name, but then I learned the Medlicotts were from a place named Medlicott.  Generally speaking, that means they were either slaves or gentry.  Then I found a history online: gentry, landed gentry.  So who were these Medlicotts?

Continue reading “The Ancient House of Medlicott”

T is for …

The latest in my ad hoc series on surname origins.

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

Talbot

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred:  Andrew Talbot. born about 1840, Oakthorpe, Derbyshire.

There are competing theories.  One is derived from Old French Talbot, a wooden billet hung round the neck of an animal to prevent straying.  However, the root that seems to have more credence as a personal name is derived from the Normandy dialect talebot, literally lampblack, after robbers who blacked their faces to avoid recognition. Continue reading “T is for …”