P is for …

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

st laurence Walton on trent
St Laurence, Walton on Trent via Geograph, copyright Bikeboy, Creative Commons.

Page

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: John Page, born about 1783, Walton-on-Trent, Derbyshire.

From Old French page, page.

Parker

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Joshua Parker, born about 1740, Forton, Shropshire.

From Old French parquier, park keeper (parkie).

Pearce

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Jemima Pearce, born about 1842, Whitwick, Leicestershire.

From Old French Piers or Pierre, Peter.

Philips

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Thomas Philips, father of Ann, born about 1610, wife of Thomas Medlicott, born about 1600, Medlicott, Shropshire.

Personal name, son of Philip.

Powell

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: William Henry Powell, born about 1865, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire.

From Welsh ap Howel or Hoell, son of Howel.

Poxon

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Henry Poxon, born about 1833, Walsall, Staffordshire.

Linked to Pogson. Pog a diminutive of Margaret, therefore son of Margaret.

preston old bull
The Old Bull, Church Street, Preston, via Geograph, copyright Alexander P Kapp 2008, Creative Commons.

Preston

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Hannah Preston, born about 1839, Edial, Staffordshire.

Place name.

Price

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Harriet Price, born about 1810, Ketley, Shropshire.

From Middle English and Old French pris, price. Metonym for a fixer or setter of prices.

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Strange marriage

What is the likelihood of two couples with identical names being married in the same quarter?  Well, I guess if they were John Smith and Mary Jones it would not be such a surprise,  but in this case they were Josiah Cooper and Edith Maria Birch. Continue reading “Strange marriage”

St Helen and the Roman Empire

I said I would post some images of the interior to St Helen’s church, Tarporley.  I am not one for religion, but I do recognise the importance of the churches in our history and the great length of continuity the church provides.

lych gate
Lych Gate, St Helen, Tarporley, Cheshire.

The inscription on the Lych Gate reads:  Let thy loving Spirit lead me forth into the land of righteousness, which seems to be from Psalm 143, though “me” is replaced by “them”.

But, as I don’t recall any mention in Sunday School, who was St Helen and why a dedication in Cheshire?

Continue reading “St Helen and the Roman Empire”

Worcester

Last week I stayed at Summerfield, just outside Kidderminster.  On Wednesday I doubled up boat-hunting with a trip to Worcester.  Here are few pictures of the cathedral and a few other things that caught my eye.

My main objective was Diglis Basin, but as I approached the cathedral the rain began.  But first, one of the city’s famous residents. Continue reading “Worcester”

Gone, but (not quite) forgotten

A bit of family history, well someone’s family history, at least.

gateway
A gateway into history

On my way back from Stratford-upon-Avon Parkway station, I passed the overgrown St Peters Graveyard in Bishopton.  Having plenty of time I thought I would mooch about.  Continue reading “Gone, but (not quite) forgotten”