The Ancient House of Medlicott

When I first encountered an ancestor whose name was Medlicott I thought it was just another name, but then I learned the Medlicotts were from a place named Medlicott.  Generally speaking, that means they were either slaves or gentry.  Then I found a history online: gentry, landed gentry.  So who were these Medlicotts?

Continue reading “The Ancient House of Medlicott”

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T is for …

The latest in my ad hoc series on surname origins.

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

Talbot

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred:  Andrew Talbot. born about 1840, Oakthorpe, Derbyshire.

There are competing theories.  One is derived from Old French Talbot, a wooden billet hung round the neck of an animal to prevent straying.  However, the root that seems to have more credence as a personal name is derived from the Normandy dialect talebot, literally lampblack, after robbers who blacked their faces to avoid recognition. Continue reading “T is for …”

Carters’ End

This is the second in a series about causes of death in Andrew’s Kindred, following on from Browns’ End.  Here I focus on my Carter ancestors, the latest of whom was Florence Carter, my maternal grandmother. Continue reading “Carters’ End”

Private 39588 Edward Price

cenotaph w s
The west face of the war memorial at Brownhills, Staffordshire, commemorating the dead of 1914-1918.

This is another blog about the brave men commemorated on the cenotaph at St James, Brownhills, Staffordshire.  Here is what I have been able to find out about Private Edward Price, killed in action on the Somme battlefield, one hundred years ago today in 1918. Continue reading “Private 39588 Edward Price”

Browns’ End

Luanne, the author of a blog I follow, The Family Kalamazoo, posted a piece about the cause of death of some of her female ancestors.  Over the years I have accumulated several records, but, unlike Luanne, had not thought to consider them together.  In this first post on the topic I will focus on my Brown ancestry.  The only one I can remember is my mother.

John Brown

Continue reading “Browns’ End”

Billy the Special

Uncle Bill Taylor, or Billy to his wife, was an “uncle” by virtue of marrying Mom’s aunty Gertie, sometime known to locals as “Nurse Taylor”.  I first knew them as a small child when we visited them in the back lane, or Chapel Street.  Aunty, as Mom called her, had been a nurse after leaving school at the age of fourteen, working at the Sister Dora (General) Hospital in Walsall, but, as was the rule at the time, was forced to give up when she married.  Gertie would for many tears tend to locals’ minor injuries, patching them up with plasters, bandages and boiled sweets as necessary. Continue reading “Billy the Special”

S is for …

Another in my ad hoc series on surname origins.

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

Scoffham

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: John Scuffum, father of George, born about 1801, Pipe Hill, near Lichfield, Staffordshire. Continue reading “S is for …”