George Dorsett (in memoriam)

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St James, Ogley Hay, south side, 2016.

In just one month’s time we will be remembering the dead from two world wars and other conflicts.  Here is another of my humble efforts to find out about those commemorated on the war memorial that stands in the churchyard to St James, Ogley Hay, in my home town of Brownhills in the West Midlands. Continue reading “George Dorsett (in memoriam)”

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St Helen and the Roman Empire

I said I would post some images of the interior to St Helen’s church, Tarporley.  I am not one for religion, but I do recognise the importance of the churches in our history and the great length of continuity the church provides.

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Lych Gate, St Helen, Tarporley, Cheshire.

The inscription on the Lych Gate reads:  Let thy loving Spirit lead me forth into the land of righteousness, which seems to be from Psalm 143, though “me” is replaced by “them”.

But, as I don’t recall any mention in Sunday School, who was St Helen and why a dedication in Cheshire?

Continue reading “St Helen and the Roman Empire”

Pony and Trap Tragedy

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Bore Street, Lichfield. Image courtesy of Brownhills Bob.

On 29 December 1900 an inquest was held at the Anglesey Arms, Watling Street, Brownhills, into the death of Elizabeth Painter, who was injured in a trap accident on 1 December and died on Christmas Day at around 4:00 or 5:00 pm. The deceased was the mother of Alice Carter, wife of George Carter, about whom I blogged last time.

The Lichfield Mercury, Friday 5 January 1900, p3 col4, reported: Continue reading “Pony and Trap Tragedy”

Sinking feeling

I was sure I had posted this before, perhaps via Brownhhills Bob, but, try as I might, I can’t find it.

This is about the demise of George Carter (1859-1906), who was my grandmother Florence’s uncle and was a coal miner.  He died of injuries sustained in an “accident” at Brownhills No.3 pit, known as The Sinking, operated by William Harrison Ltd. I believe this pit was at Slackey Lane (now Hazel Lane), Great Wyrley, where the industrial buildings are today.

Continue reading “Sinking feeling”

Steam Mill Street

Way back in 1836 Edward Evans was baptised in the Primitive Methodist Chapel on Steam Mill Street, Chester.  According to the register it was on 25 May 1836.  Edward was born on 5 January of that year in the parish of St John’s, the sixth child of William Evans and Priscilla Mould (sic).  So, as I am staying nearby, I went to Chester to see what remains.  Edward was my grandmother’s grandfather.  Some of his story is told in Evans the Boat.

edward evans 1836 baptism
Edward Evans baptism.

Continue reading “Steam Mill Street”