Strange marriage

What is the likelihood of two couples with identical names being married in the same quarter?  Well, I guess if they were John Smith and Mary Jones it would not be such a surprise,  but in this case they were Josiah Cooper and Edith Maria Birch. Continue reading “Strange marriage”

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The Pub Shinglers

One of the earliest mysteries in Andrew’s KIndred was The Pub Dennises.  This concerned a number of descendants of second great grandfather Henry Dennis, about whom my folks new next to nothing.  Well, there is a parallel with the Shinglers, some of whom married Dennises.  I asked a Shingler if she knew anything about her publican relatives and she knew not.  This follows the most recent (John I Chapter V) in my sequence on my old house and surroundings, as Dad’s uncle Jack sold on the lease to Wallace John Shingler; 14 July 1948, below. Continue reading “The Pub Shinglers”

Pony and Trap Tragedy

bore street
Bore Street, Lichfield. Image courtesy of Brownhills Bob.

On 29 December 1900 an inquest was held at the Anglesey Arms, Watling Street, Brownhills, into the death of Elizabeth Painter, who was injured in a trap accident on 1 December and died on Christmas Day at around 4:00 or 5:00 pm. The deceased was the mother of Alice Carter, wife of George Carter, about whom I blogged last time.

The Lichfield Mercury, Friday 5 January 1900, p3 col4, reported: Continue reading “Pony and Trap Tragedy”

Sinking feeling

I was sure I had posted this before, perhaps via Brownhhills Bob, but, try as I might, I can’t find it.

This is about the demise of George Carter (1859-1906), who was my grandmother Florence’s uncle and was a coal miner.  He died of injuries sustained in an “accident” at Brownhills No.3 pit, known as The Sinking, operated by William Harrison Ltd. I believe this pit was at Slackey Lane (now Hazel Lane), Great Wyrley, where the industrial buildings are today.

Continue reading “Sinking feeling”

Publicans & Beer Sellers

Revised to inlclude download link.

This is a bit of hard core local history research, but it might be the sort of project that appeals to other family historians with heritage to do with pubs and beer houses.

prince of wales 2 (640x531)
Prince of Wales, Watling Street, Brownhills.

For several years I have been building a dataset of public houses, inns and beerhouses, with particular focus on their proprietors, managers and keepers.  I have focused on the areas inhabited by those ancestors who lived near to my home, that is mainly Brownhills and Chasetown.  I have been in many of them at one time or another, those that were still open in my adult life.  Some were run at one time by Andrew’s Kindred – the “Pub Dennises“, some were, doubtless, frequented by others, and some grew up there.

You are welcome to download, share and add more information.

Continue reading “Publicans & Beer Sellers”

Hard Times At The Collieries

I found an article in the local press, one among many about parents not sending their children regularly to school, which resonated in two ways.  Most recently the debate about parents who take their children out of school for holidays, and maybe the reason from around 1875-80, why some of Andrew’s Kindred migrated to Derbyshire to find work.

Continue reading “Hard Times At The Collieries”

Who was the father?

Any genealogist or family historian who has researched more than two or three generations will almost certainly have found someone whose father does not appear on the entry of birth or baptism record.  In many cases there is not real clue as to the identity of the father and dubious speculation is all that will ever be available.

However, sometimes there is a clue.  In the case of my grandmother, “Nan”, this was in the form of unsupported family lore.  Much later, though, Nan’s mother and alleged father married, which adds some force to the argument – see Mystery number one: Nan (part 3).

The identity of the unnamed father is sometimes hinted at on official entries of death, and there are two examples in my tree that I have found.

Continue reading “Who was the father?”