Nantwich: pub sign crawl

The other day I had a wander round Nantwich, Cheshire, to capture images of pub signs, with the intention of finding out a little about them.  They are in no particular order, and my list may not be comprehensive.

The Black Lion Continue reading “Nantwich: pub sign crawl”

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Who was the father?

Any genealogist or family historian who has researched more than two or three generations will almost certainly have found someone whose father does not appear on the entry of birth or baptism record.  In many cases there is no real clue as to the identity of the father and dubious speculation is all that will ever be available.

However, sometimes there is a clue.  In the case of my grandmother, “Nan”, this was in the form of unsupported family lore.  Much later, though, Nan’s mother and alleged father married, which adds some force to the argument – see Mystery number one: Nan (part 3).

The identity of the unnamed father is sometimes hinted at on official entries of birth, and there are two examples in my tree that I have found.

Continue reading “Who was the father?”

White Horse Inn

Not the Hollywood musical, the pub in Brownhills, West Midlands, England.

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The White Horse, White Horse Road, Brownhills, 2016.

After a discussion yesterday morning about this local landmark, I decided to check my facts, having said that the current building is not the original White Horse and that the original stood nearer to the end of the “back lane”, or Chapel Street, as it is today. I guess the colloquial name predates the chapel that stood at the junction of Chapel Street and Watling Street. Well, on this occasion I was right! Continue reading “White Horse Inn”

The Decline and Fall of the English Public House

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Prince of Wales, Watling Street, Brownhills, 2016.

It is said that eight pubs close every day in this fair land. The reasons are complex, but the plainest is that fewer people are frequenting local pubs in villages and suburbs in favour of drinking at home, buying booze from supermarkets, discount suppliers and direct from micro-brewers.

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Rising Sun, Watling Street, Brownhills West, 2016.

In my own experience over the last fifty-odd years I can recall many pubs that have closed, and there were many more before that. In The Pub Dennises (2) is a map showing 5 pubs on the short 500 metre length of Chasetown High Street. There were at least two beer houses and two other pubs within 100 metres. This was not an unusual setup. Along, or very near to, the Watling Street, Brownhills, were no fewer than eight pubs and more beer houses operating between 1900 and 1912 along a stretch of 2.3 km (1.4 miles), see map below.  And there were others within easy walking distance. Continue reading “The Decline and Fall of the English Public House”