T is for …

The latest in my ad hoc series on surname origins.

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

Talbot

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred:  Andrew Talbot. born about 1840, Oakthorpe, Derbyshire.

There are competing theories.  One is derived from Old French Talbot, a wooden billet hung round the neck of an animal to prevent straying.  However, the root that seems to have more credence as a personal name is derived from the Normandy dialect talebot, literally lampblack, after robbers who blacked their faces to avoid recognition. Continue reading “T is for …”

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R is for …

Continuing my exploration of surname origins in Andrew’s Kindred.

Based on: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

Rathbone

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred:  William Rathbone, born about 1793, Coventry, Warwickshire. Continue reading “R is for …”

F is for …

From: Reaney, P H, (ed. Wilson, R M), 1997, Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., OUP, Oxford, unless otherwise stated.

Fairfield

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: George Fairfield born 1854 Norton Canes, Staffordshire.

Dweller by the fair field.

Fewkes

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Benjamin Fewkes born 1786 Swannington, Leicestershire.

There seems to be nothing conclusive. Old German for folk? Old French for falcon – more likely after conquest? Perhaps evolved into Fox? Maybe something to do with Fuchs, such as the German botanist?

Finch

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: Henry Finch born 1743 Measham, Derbyshire.

From the Anglo-Saxon Old English finc the modern finch, a nickname for a simpleton, or perhaps bird-brain. The English finch has the German equivalent fink. Today fink is used, mainly in America, to refer to an unpleasant or contemptible person.

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Chaffinch

It is suggested that one origin may be from a catcher or seller of birds for cages or the table (Dictionary of American Family Names 2013, Oxford University Press); for example like Tamino, in The Magic Flute.

Fletcher

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: James Fletcher born 1807 Horsley Woodhouse, Derbyshire.

Old French flechier or flecher, maker or seller of arrows.

fletcher

Fryer

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: John Fryer born 1830 Bishampton, Worcestershire.

From Old French frere, brother = friar (as in Friar Tuck, of Robin Hood fame).

Fullelove

Earliest in Andrew’s Kindred: William Fullelove born 1848 Whitwick, Leicestershire.

Full of love. Subsidy Rolls Cambridgeshire ffulofloue 1327, Subsidy Rolls Cumberland ffuloflof 1332. To be fair this looks obvious!  Seems very much a Yorkshire name.

Aer Reg, if you are passing by, this seems to fit.